Heloderma Horridum from Biologia Centrali-Americana.

image for Heloderma Horridum from Biologia Centrali-Americana.
Book Title
Biologia Centrali-Americana. Reptilia and Batrachia.
Caption
Heloderma Horridum.
Educational Notes
These lizards may look harmless. But, keep your guard up because the Mexican Beaded Lizard is one of few known types of lizards to be venomous. When a Mexican Beaded Lizard bites into its prey, it delivers a nerve poison. They don’t have fangs like a venomous snake, though. Instead, these lizards have grooves on their teeth that funnel the poison from their glands to their prey. The Mexican Beaded Lizard eats many kinds of animals, including baby rabbits, rodents, birds, lizards, frogs, and insects. It catches most of its prey on the ground, but if necessary, it will climb a tree or dig in the dirt for food. From this picture, you can see why it’s called a beaded lizard. Each of its scales has a tiny bump making the lizard’s skin look like it’s made of beads. Something else that is special about this lizard is how it stores fat. Like a camel, it stores lots of fat in one place—not in a hump like a camel does—but in its tail. Because of this, their tails can get pretty big. This is a good adaptation to have, especially if one of these carnivorous lizards is on the lazier side. If it doesn’t like to spend a lot of time hunting, the lizard will still survive off the stored fat if needed.
The image shows a top, bottom, and side view of a beaded lizard.
Topic
Reptiles
Lizards
Smithsonian Libraries
Publication Date
1885-1902
Publisher
R. H. Porter
Taxonomy
Heloderma horridum
Rights
No Copyright - United States
Creator
Günther, Albert
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Language
English
Latin
Publication Place
London
Image ID
SIL-bca_04_00_00_376
Catalog ID
742627
Type
Prints