Zora Neale Hurston

images for Zora Neale Hurston
Exhibition Label
Zora Neale Hurston was a writer and anthropologist whose novels and essays revealed the vital ethnic culture of southern African Americans. Raised in the all-black town of Eatonville, Florida, Hurston moved to New York City to study with Franz Boas and became a striking, stylish figure of the Harlem Renaissance. A charismatic raconteur, Hurston was brutally honest in writing and in person. In Mules and Men (1935), she captured the rich voices and mythos of the African American oral storytelling tradition. In Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), her heroine learns independence the hard way and concisely captures the modernist ethos of the self: "You gotta go there to know there." In her essays Hurston analyzed the aesthetics of spirituals, sermon s, juke joints, and African American vernacular English. Alice Walker’s rediscovery of Hurston in the early 1980s—after four decades of neglect—remains one of the great comeback stories in American literary history.
Topic
Costume\Jewelry\Necklace
Interior
Costume\Headgear\Hat
Zora Neale Hurston: Female
Zora Neale Hurston: Literature\Writer\Novelist
Zora Neale Hurston: Humanities and Social Sciences\Folklorist
Portrait
National Portrait Gallery
Restrictions & Rights
1935 negative © Carl Van Vechten Trust Gravure and compilation ©The Eakins Press Foundation
Artist
Carl Van Vechten, 17 Jun 1880 - 21 Dec 1964
Sitter
Zora Neale Hurston, 1891 - 28 Jan 1960
Credit Line
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Medium
Photogravure
Dimensions
Image: 22.5 x 14.9cm (8 7/8 x 5 7/8")
Sheet: 55.7 x 35.6cm (21 15/16 x 14")
Mat (custom size): 61 x 40.6cm (24 x 16")
See more items in
National Portrait Gallery Collection
1935 (printed 1983)
Type
Photograph
Object number
NPG.83.188.24
Culture
Zora Neale Hurston: American\African American