Keith Haring

image for Keith Haring
Exhibition Label
"How can it be possible that apartheid [in South Africa] still exists? Dr. King was speaking against it 20 years ago," wrote artist Keith Haring in exasperation in 1988. Martin Roy's photograph pictures Haring on a New York City subway platform posing beside one of his celebrated white chalk drawings. In this and other works during a meteoric career that lasted just over a decade, Haring demonstrated a commitment to various political and social causes, including apartheid, nuclear disarmament, and especially the AIDS crisis. Although some art critics expressed concern about his efforts to market his work to a mass audience, Haring believed that art should be as accessible as possible: "You can't just stay in your studio and paint; that's not the most effective way to communicate."
Credit Line
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in
National Portrait Gallery Collection
1989
Object number
NPG.2001.49
Artist
Martin Roy
Sitter
Keith Haring, 4 May 1958 - 16 Feb 1990
Topic
Exterior
Artwork
Keith Haring: Male
Keith Haring: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter
Keith Haring: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist
Keith Haring: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter\Muralist
Portrait
Place
United States\New York\Kings\New York
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Image: 36.9 x 24.9 cm (14 1/2 x 9 13/16")
Sheet: 50.4 x 38.7 cm (19 13/16 x 15 1/4")
Mat: 71.1 x 55.9 cm (28 x 22")
National Portrait Gallery
Type
Photograph