Woman's wrapper

images for Woman's wrapper
Object Name
adire
Label Text
Adire ia an ordinary commercially woven cloth that is transformed by hand dying with localy made indigo dye. To create the elaborate patterns of adire the artist blocks the dye from reaching the surface of the cloth. This is done by painting or stenciling with a starch such as cassava paste, or by tying or sewing knots and seams. This pattern is called sun bebe or "lifting up the sun," and is made by painting with starch resist. The pattern name refers to the beads girls wore around their hips. While dancing the beads would move up and down. The beads were especially worn by girls who were to be married, and in private ceremonial dances, they performed before their future husbands.
Adire was first produced in quantity in the late nineteenth century, with production dwindling by World War II. The 1960s saw a revived interest in adire with new patterns, and new uses superceeding the original use as women's wrappers.
Cotton cloth wrapper with indigo dyed pattern of 56 squares in 8 x 7 blocks, hand painted, with the painter's mark visible on the margin.
Provenance
Jane Barbour, acquired Abeokuta, Nigeria, ca. 1969 to 1996
Exhibition History
TxtStyles: Fashioning Identity, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., June 11-December 7, 2008
Adire: Resist-Dyed Cloths of the Yoruba, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., April 16-August 17, 1997
Published References
National Museum of African Art. 1997. Adire: Resist-Dyed Cloths of the Yoruba. Exhibition brochure. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, no. 19.
Topic
Adornment
Female use
spiral
National Museum of African Art
Yoruba artist
Credit Line
Museum purchase
Medium
Cotton, indigo dye
Dimensions
H x W: 195 x 174.2 cm (76 3/4 x 68 9/16 in.)
See more items in
National Museum of African Art Collection
Geography
Nigeria
Mid-20th century
Type
Costume and Textile
Object number
96-1-20