Turbulent Era Sparked Leap in Human Behavior: Drill Core

Human Origins Program, Smithsonian; core image courtesy of LacCore, University of Minnesota.
October 21, 2020
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Human Origins Program, Smithsonian; core image courtesy of LacCore, University of Minnesota.

The team’s analysis suggests that as parts of the grassy plains in the region were fragmented along fault lines due to tectonic activity, small basins formed. These areas were more sensitive to changes in rainfall than the larger lake basins that had been there before. Elevated terrain also allowed water runoff from high ground to contribute to the formation and drying out of lakes. These changes occurred during a period when precipitation had become more variable, leading to frequent and dramatic fluctuations in water supply.

With the fluctuations, a broader set of ecological changes also took place. The team found that vegetation in the region also changed repeatedly, shifting between grassy plains and wooded areas. Meanwhile, large grazing herbivores, which no longer had large tracts of grass to feed on, began to die out and were replaced by smaller mammals with more diverse diets.

The findings suggest that instability in their surrounding climate, land and ecosystem was a key driver in the development of new traits and behaviors underpinning human adaptability.

Human Origins Program, Smithsonian; core image courtesy of LacCore, University of Minnesota.

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