2000 Courses

Library and Archives Preservation: Introduction to the Preservation Activities at the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education (Dianne van der Reyden)
March 16, 2000
Offered through the University of Maryland's College of Library and Information Services (LBSC), this will be a half-day session for graduate students enrolled in LBSC's Library and Archives Preservation Course.  It will update the students on SCMRE's developments in paper conservation, featuring specifically outreach activities including videos, web curricula, etc.  It will also introduce the students to the type of scientific facilities required for paper preservation research into the nature and care of specialty papers (such as tracing and pigment coated papers) found in libraries and archives.  For more information contact LBSC.

Challenges Facing Museums: Conservation and Preservation in the New Millennium (Dianne van der Reyden)
March 28 & 30, 2000
These two sessions are part of a training course offered by the US Army Center of Military History (CMH).  The first session will feature a panel discussion on preservation strategic planning, to be held at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA.  The second session will include a tour of the SCMRE facilities at the Museum Support Center, Suitland, MD.  For further information, contact CMH at (202) 685-2470.

The 26th Annual Conference of the Association of North American Graduate Programs in Conservation (ANAGPIC) (Mel Wachowiak)
April 27-29, 2000
This conference is for graduate students in conservation progams in North America to present their research papers.

Small Business Practices for Conservators (Washington Conservation Guild)
April 29, 2000
This one-day workshop conducted by the Washington Conservation Guild and held in the SCMRE Theater will address a number of concerns for conservators who are small business entrepreneurs, including, accounting, legal issues and contracts, insurance, and other topics.  For further information contact WCG at PO Box 23364, Washington, DC 20026 or 301-238-3700 x 178.

Preserving Memories (Dianne van der Reyden)
May 26, 2000
This workshop is part of the annual Military Survivor Seminar for the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), to be held at the Marriott Crystal Gateway, Arlington, VA.  It will cover the preservation of memorabilia, including documents, newspaper clippings, and photograph albums.  For further information contact TAPS at 1-800-959-TAPS.

9th International Congress on Deterioration and Conservation of Stone
June 19-24, 2000
This conference is organized by UVO and IVBC in association with ICCROM, Smithsonian Institution, CNR, Universita Ca' Foscari, and IUAV.  For further information and to register please see http://www.vegapark.ve.it/ivbc/congress2000

Molding and Casting (Donald C. Williams)
July 2-4, 2000
A presentation/workshop offered by SCMRE at the convention of the Association of Restorers in San Jose, CA.  For further information contact AOR at 1-800-260-1829.

Technology and Preservation of Furniture, Paintings and Paper-based Artifacts (Donald C. Williams, Francine T. Lewis)
July 10-14, 2000
Offered through the George Washington University, this course is a five-afternoon survey of the materials, fabrication, deterioration and preservation of paintings, furniture, and paper.  The course will include lectures and demonstrations by SCMRE staff, and is intended to inform prospective caretakers and appraisers on the nature of these artifacts.  To register, contact: GWU Appraisal Studies Program, (202) 973-1175.

Polarized Light Microscopy - Fundamentals and Applications for Conservators and Archaeologists (Martha Goodway, and Jan Hinsch, Leica Microsystems, Inc.)
July 17-21, 2000  $500.00
This course furnishes an in-depth look at the fundamentals of polarized light microscopy and applications for those in museum and/or archaeological fields.  It includes principles (wave nature of light, isotropy, anisotropy and optical activity), mechanics and use of polarizing microscopes, sample preparation, orthoscopy and special methods.  This course will provide the practical application of polarized light microscopy towards the identification of natural fibers and artists pigments.  Attendees will be selected from the applicants in concert with the faculty.  Do not send payment with your registration.

Preservation Environmental Monitors and the Climate Notebook Software Program (Dianne van der Reyden, Mary Studt)
July 19, 2000
This half-day session will feature a demonstration and discussion by Jim Reilly, Director of the Image Permanence Institute (IPI).  IPI is known for it's many useful preservation tools including aids for the identification of photos, Photo Activity Tests, Film-Based Deterioration A-D Strips, and the freely downloadable Preservation Calculator.  Reilly will introduce IPI's latest breakthrough: an integrated program for monitoring and evaluating storage systems for collections.  This will be the first meeting of 2000 for the Smithsonian Institution's Research, Library and Archives Collections Conservation Task Force (RELACT).  For further information, see RELACT's upcoming events list or calendar for the appropriate date.

Technology and Preservation of Glass, Ceramics, Pottery, and Metals (Donald C. Williams, Carol A. Grissom, Pamela B. Vandiver, Martha Goodway)
July 25-27, 2000
Offered through the George Washington University, this course is a five-afternoon survey of the materials, fabrication, deterioration and preservation of glass, ceramics, pottery, and metals.  The course will include lectures and demonstrations by SCMRE staff, and is intended to inform prospective caretakers and appraisers on the nature of these artifacts.  To register contact: GWU Appraisal Studies Program, (202) 973-1175.

Plant Anatomy and Morphology for Objects Conservators and Archaeologists (Harry A. Alden)
July 31-August 4, 2000  $500.00
This course provides an introduction to and appreciation of plant anatomy and morphology for those dealing with ethnographic objects made from or containing plant materials.  Emphasis is on herbaceous characters of leaves, stems, roots and bark.  Wood anatomy and identification is covered in a separate course.  The information provided will form the basis for construction of reference material sets, recognition of anatomical characters and comparative analysis of unknown samples.  Areas covered include anatomical characters, sampling, microtechniques, and data accumulation from both reference and unknown materials.  Students are welcome to bring an object for analysis.  Attendees will be selected from the applicants in concert with faculty.  Do not send payment with your registration.

Wood Anatomy and Identification (Harry A. Alden)
August 14-18, 2000  $500.00
This course provides an introduction to wood anatomy of temperate and tropical species and to their macroscopic and microscopic identification.  Emphasis is placed on real-life applications of analysis of samples from wooden artifacts from museum and archaeological contexts (including charcoal).  Areas covered include sampling, microtechniques, character identification and identification of unknowns using reference sets, dichotomous keys and computer applications.  Students are welcome to bring an object for analysis.

Archaeology, Anthropology and Conservation (Harriet F. Beaubien)
Fall 2000
A cross-listed course in the graduate conservation program (NYU Institute of Fine Arts) and in the graduate anthropology program (NYU main campus).  Tentatively Wednesdays, 2-4 pm.  For further information contact Rita Wright at the Anthropology Department, New York University, 212-998-8550.

Santos: Substance and Soul  (Jia-sun Tsang, Donald C. Williams)
September 17, 2000-March 31, 2001
The first installation of an SCMRE created exhibit dealing with the technical examination, characterization and preservation of wooden Hispanic American veneration art - Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution.  Additional venues for the exhibit include Albuquerque, NM and San Juan, PR.  Numerous education programming events will be integrated into the exhibit schedule; please check our web site for further information.

Physical and Mechanical Properties of Artifact Materials (Marion F. Mecklenburg, Charles S. Tumosa)
September 18-20, 2000  $300.00
CANCELLED
This summary course will cover the effects of time, temperature, and relative humidity on the mechanical and dimensional behavior of selected cultural materials.  The materials included will be oil and acrylic paints, wood, canvas, and hide glue.  The course will cover in some detail the environment's effect on the structural behavior of materials when assembled into composites.  Such composites would include wood and fabric supported paintings.  Finally, the course will explore methods for determining the allowable changes of temperature and RH that objects can sustain safely.

Technology of Furniture Making I - Structure (Donald C. Williams, Francine T. Lewis)
October 2-6, 2000
Offered through the George Washington University, this five-afternoon course will be a demonstration-based presentation of furniture fabrication emphasizing the materials and techniques employed in the harvesting and preparation of lumber, and the cutting and assembly of the components.  Particular emphasis will be on the differences in pre-mechanized and post-mechanized processes.  To register contact: GWU Appraisal Studies Program, (202) 973-1175.

Technology of Furniture Making II - Decoration (Donald C. Williams, Francine T. Lewis)
October 16-20, 2000
Offered through the George Washington University, this five-afternoon course will be a demonstration-based presentation of furniture fabrication, emphasizing the techniques of surface decoration: carving, marquetry, painted and transparent finishes, metal leaf.  To register contact: GWU Appraisal Studies Program, (202) 973-1175.

Preserving Large and Diverse (Natural History) Collections (Donald C. Williams)
October 30-November 3, 2000  $400.00
An introduction of the integrated approach to managing and preserving multi-disciplinary collections, especially those with widely divergent materials and uses; course topics include: risk assessment; categorizing collection specimens; and collection profiling applied to collections care strategic development.  The course will include a full-scale exercise in Smithsonian Institution collections.

Microscopy of Protective and Decorative Coatings (Melvin J. Wachowiak)
November 6-10, 2000  $500.00
This course is the newest offering in our ongoing microscopy series, and will focus on the practical techniques for characterization of paint and varnish systems.  While the equipment and techniques will be discussed extensively, a large portion of the course will be spent in practical laboratory exercises.  Topic will include:

  • sample preparation: this is the most critical factor influencing the quality of microscopy, therefore, materials and methods of preparation for reproducible, high-quality, cost- and time-efficient mounts will be covered.  Attendees will receive molds, resins and other supplies.

  • the stereomicroscope: this under-utilized tool will be profiled as a critical part of microanalysis and documentation schemes; common and novel uses of this tool will be covered.

  • light microscopy techniques: brightfield, darkfield, fluorescence, transmitted light, and combined methods will be discussed and used.

  • documentation: photographic techniques (including film formats and selection criteria), video, and digital techniques will be covered.

  • design of studio space for microscopy, ergonomics, specifying and purchasing microscopes, and other topics will be addressed as time permits.

The course is intended for the conservator, museum scientist, or other professional with some experience in this area.  Attendees will be encouraged to participate fully in dialog during lecture, and discuss their experiences in microscopy.  Attendees are encouraged to bring samples from their practice, and consider bringing their own microscopes to the course.  There will be ample time for open lab to prepare and examine your samples.

Equipment available: a range of stereomicroscopes and laboratory-grade microscopes will be available, including those equipped for brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence.

Ten attendees will be accepted for this course.  Do not send payment with the registration application.

Bugging Out: Integrated Pest Management (Dianne van der Reyden, Mary Studt)
November 16, 2000
This lecture and workshop is part of the 8th annual program for Smithsonian Institution's Research, Library and Archives Collections Conservation Task Force (RELACT).  An introductory lecture on IPM for paper-based collections will touch on issues of history, traditional techniques, strategies, assessment, threshold determination, control and evaluation.  The workshop will consist of a series of practical exercises to implement some of the topics covered in the lecture.  For further information, see RELACT's upcoming events list or calendar.

Preservation of Archives and Research Document Collections (Dianne van der Reyden, Fei-wen Tsai)
December 11-15, 2000 (date tentative)  $400.00
CANCELLED

This week-long introductory course is part of SCMRE's Santa Clara University collaboration.  It covers basic problems and solutions relevant to care of collections in libraries, archives and museums.  Problems concerning collections include issues of value, use and risk pertinent to various types of substrates, media and formats.  Solutions addressing these problems require delegating responsibilities for preservation management, reformatting, environmental control, collections maintenance, conservation treatment, research and training.  Emphasis will be on options inherent to these issues, as well as development and implementation of strategic plans, preservation priorities, cost-benefit analysis, and grants.  Information will be provided on developing policies, procedures and practices.  Course materials will include an interactive website, PowerPoint presentations, videos, and handouts.  For more information see RELACT's upcoming events list or calendar.

Other topics or courses will be incorporated as the SCMRE Education programming evolves.

For further information on these or other SCMRE Education programming, contact:


SCMRE Education Program
Museum Support Center
4210 Silver Hill Road
Suitland, MD 20746

(301) 238-1240 PHONE
(301) 238-3709 FAX